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GuideStar Blog

Brian Saber

Recent Posts by Brian Saber:

7 Tips to Get Your Organization to Embrace Fundraising



Asking doesn’t just happen out of nowhere.
Your organization has to embrace asking clear across the board in order for you to develop a strong culture of asking.


Case Study: This Organization Got Board Responsibility Right


The following is a case study interview between Brian Saber, Asking Matters, and John Collins, founder and executive director of the St. Petersburg Arts Alliance, to understand his strategy behind successfully preparing board members to become leaders and advocates for his organization. 


Brian: Hi John. From what I understand you took a different approach to building your board when you founded the St. Petersburg Arts Alliance in 2012. Can you share what you did and why you did it?


Quid Pro Quo: The Fastest Way to Deaden Your Board

 Board members hate quid pro quo fundraising, and I don’t blame them. How intrusive to ask one’s board members to cough up their entire contact list, and how unstrategic.I recently led one of the many board trainings I conduct each year, and heard the same complaints I always hear:

  • “I don’t want to ask all my friends because they’ll ask me in return.”
  • “My friends are deadbeats. I’m tired of asking and not getting anywhere.”
  • “My friends are cheap. They give less to my organization than I give to theirs.”
  • “I’m tapped out. I’ve asked everyone I know.”
  • “They have their own organizations and areas of interest. They’re not interested in mine.”

And they’re right! All these are valid reasons for them not to want to cast the net wide. They should be valid reasons for you as well.


Evolution or Revolution? How Do We Create a Fundraising Board?

 

Here’s what I’ve learned after working with more than 100 boards: Virtually every organization is frustrated with their board’s personal giving and involvement in fundraising, and everyone thinks their situation is unique. In fact, most small to mid-sized organizations (which is most organizations!) are more similar than not and the solution is generally the same.


Debunking the 15% Overhead for Good


Can we please stop the management consultants and charity evaluators of the world from poisoning the water with their mantra of 15% overhead? I know they mean well, but constantly harping on this 15% ideal is simplistic and is causing great harm to many wonderful, worthy organizations.